Ask me anything!

Our most popular blog topic, “Ask me anything”, is back. This is your chance to ask me questions on the subject of investing, risk management, portfolio management and of course.. technical analysis.

To ask a question, you need to post it on the comment section of this blog by midnight Wednesday July 14th.

For those who haven’t followed this blog for long – here are the ground rules for the “Ask me” blogs:

  1. Investment questions should be of broad interest to many investors. They can involve broad-sector questions, questions about various international markets, or questions about individual commodities or bonds.
  2. Please don’t ask about individual stocks. The exception might be in massively followed stocks like the FAANG’s. Better to ask about stock sectors, world markets, asset classes, commodities, etc. For example: Cannabis, gold, European markets, the utilities sector, the tech sector, oil, transports, long bonds, etc. Ask about the US banking sector rather than my opinion on Bank America. Or you might just have  questions on technical/fundamental analysis rules, or unique strategies like hedging or stop loss rules, etc.
  3. You can ask as simple a question as you wish. And don’t worry – there’s no such thing as a dumb question! But feel free to ask the hard stuff too! I’ll do my best to get as many questions covered as I can.
  4. Questions on technical analysis methods and contrarian investing are very welcome.
  5. Don’t ask our opinion on the economy, real estate, employment, and other such queries. We are not economists.
  6. If you wish to ask a fundamental analysis question, feel free to post it. Craig Aucoin will add his answers to the mix.

Finally – We’ll probably be answering the questions over two or three blogs.  The first number of questions will be posted next Thursday July 15th. If your question isn’t answered on that blog, and assuming it meets my rule of “no individuals stocks, no economic questions”, then look for coverage of your question during the following week (week of July 19th).

 

 

 

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22 Comments

  • Are Chinese equities providing an attractive opportunity with a lot of their large well known companies at or below their 200 day EMAs? For instance BABA just hit its 200 week EMA and TCEHY just hit its 100 week EMA.

    The Chinese government seems to have reigned back on their stimulus and a lot of their stocks are in bear market territory and are currently undervalued as per their fundamental fair value. A lot of people in North America seem to have given up on Chinese equities because they can’t stand the government regulatory crackdown on Chinese Big Tech any longer and have decided to stick with US equities, but it seems counterintuitive given that US tech seems like a crowded trade now. There’s also ongoing fear that the US will eventually delist Chinese companies and the two superpowers will continue their combative stance against each other in the nearby future and there

    I recall back in 2018 when the CCP went after Tencent’s gaming platform and the stock went down 40% between Jan 2018 to Oct 2018 before reaching all time highs a few years later. Charlie Munger also made a big purchase of Alibaba shares a few weeks ago and if anyone would know value I would think it would be Warren Buffett’s business partner.

    Thanks very much for all you do. Love reading your blogs.

    Regards,
    Matt

    Reply
  • Assuming that the market eventually goes south in a big way, I am planning to make a very sizeable bet on the best-in-breed; Curaleaf @ $11-ish. Agree? After all, the marijuana industry is a brand new frontier and fortunes were made in the early days with Canopy.

    Reply
    • Bruce I won’t be answering questions on individual stocks

      Reply
        • Bruce–on the BNN show, I can bang out an answer very quickly with a brief look at the chart. Answering a question on the blog requires adding the chart with my notations, along with spending time writing about the observations. In 45 minutes of BNN I can knock off 20 charts. For the blog–It takes me 15-20 minutes minimum to do a stock highlight (and that’s not a deep one) – try to imagine if everyone asked about a stock- which from a common interest is going to be less appealing. In your case, you were asking about a relatively little followed stock- and your question was specific (more or less “should I buy this”?) Legally – I cannot provide specific investment advice on the suitability of a stock to an individual investor who I do not have signed paperwork with–its a no-no in my profession. Instead, I can offer opinions to broader concepts and general outlook on stocks /sectors without making specific advice to an investor for their unique situation.
          So: its a time, general interest by a large population of readers, and finally a licensing issue for me to go too specific on this blog.
          Thanks – good question and glad you asked–hope that helps clarify the situation

          Reply
  • Hi Keith,

    What do you think of the uranium sector in terms of an investment now?

    Thanks,
    Lee

    Reply
  • What are your thoughts on Cooper and what is your favourite Cooper stock

    Reply
  • Hi Keith
    Over the years I have had good results from my research in picking stocks. But also lots of duds. Buying is not a problem. BNN Market Call guests have helped with suggestions that I then research. But almost all guests are buy side. I tend to hold stocks for 3-5 years
    My difficulty is selling. No one tells you when to sell. You have suggested stops but using stops on a volatile stock is counter intuitive to me. The swings will get you.
    I have less issues on the down side so maybe that makes greed – or losing out – a factor. The mental game of the stock market.
    I have had a number of small cap stocks that have gone up between 3 and 8 fold over the past 2-3 years. VMD, VZLA, PGM,ECN. With that kind trading swing do you have any suggestions on the sell side.

    Reply
  • Looking at historical charts of the NYSE there seems to be bouts of upward movements and sideways movements. For example 1929 top didnt get breached until 1955 then an up market until 1962 then sideways until 1982. Basically a bull Market from 82 until 2000. What do you think from a chart perspective is the path forward for the index on the sp500?
    Thanks Keith
    Shawn

    Reply
  • Oil again please 🙂 I’ve been trading the ins-and outs for the last year + (‘everyone’s a genius in a bull market’) and we seem to be at yet another crossroads for oil.

    Door A) Opec+ falls apart, Shale has a resurgence and oil stocks tank on excess supply.

    B) Demand outstrips supply due to shale’s newfound religion, ESG, and “dirty oil” remains so out of favour withholding financing and investments.

    Oil’s reliance on so many factors has me mostly out and counting my winnings, but would like your view of technicals that may round out the decision of whether more upside might be in order.

    Thanks

    Reply
  • 10 yr continuing going lower, or a head fake before it rises to 1.85%?

    Reply
  • Can you recommend a book(s) for a teenager(16 yrs of age) on money management and investing?

    Reply
  • Hi Keith, what sectors or funds would you recommend an investor turn to in an extended bear market?

    Reply
  • Any suggestions for people that have a DCP and are able to move assets in and out of equity markets international, cash and bonds . In the past I was in the D for Default fund 60/40 but have since went to a 90/10. Wondering if it might be the time to go less risk like a 20/80

    Reply
  • Hi Keith I have a DCPP and am currently in a 85% equity USA Canada Europe, 10% bond, 5% cash. Is it time for me to reduce risk? If so what would you suggest

    Reply
  • Hello Keith, Big fan of yours. I need some help on how to build a max out TFSA portfolio. A buy and hold style. Well diversified across all sectors. Can you help with that, cause I know you like to move in and out of different things as they rotate. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
  • Can the Airline sector ever become investment -grade anymore ?
    Warren Buffet had invested in Delta Airlines, after due diligence and using
    his common sense Benjamin Graham fundamental analysis, but backed out shortly after, with big losses, after seeing the cash flow and income statement were not what he was expecting.

    This year, Air Canada announced a drop of 13 billion ( thirteen!) in revenues and sales. That is staggering and mind-blowing for any Canadian to grasp.

    Air Transat is almost out of the picture, all airplanes down due to COVID19 and flights to Carribean destinations being off-limits and taboo to Canadian tourists, among other travel spots.

    World-Wide, long term ( 5 years or more) can an Airline become part of a viable medium to long term investment strategy TFSA or RRSP, RSP ?

    Reply
  • I hold some “green-ish” utilities (NPI, AQN, BEP and others, bought well) as a core part of my portfolio, long term, with at least 10 years before retirement. On one hand, I would expect an increasing return over time through a combination of dividends and modest growth. On the other, they’re interest rate sensitive. I’ve heard many in the media acknowledge these opposing forces in a qualitative way, however I’m trying to figure out how one should consider this from a more quantitative approach. Or put another way, at level of interest rates, inflation, sentiment, or other metric would one expect this sector to roll over for an extended period?

    I really enjoy your musings. Thank you.

    Reply
  • A lot of long term stock charts look like a Loch Ness monster illustration since the pandemic. Up and down,,with a flat or small upward trend. Then in the middle of 2020 the monsters neck and head are way up out of the water. Should I be avoiding stocks that have a chart like that.

    Reply
  • are there any split shares class A such as sbc and ens that could be considered a good buy for a dividend investor or are they all out of bounds?

    Reply
  • I have recently come across “Barchart.com”.
    It would appear they have a variety of tools new to me.
    eg TTM Squeeze, Moving Linear Regression, Heikin Ashi Smoothed and others / they have information all there tools to a point.
    Are these indicators any good?
    Do you have and particular setting that are better than the defaults they have?
    Vic

    Reply
    • Hi Vic–I am unfamiliar or dont use these indicators. My style is more of a traditionalist–so I wont post your question (no sense posting it to say I have nothing to offer you!)

      Reply

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